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2020

Smoking on India's streaming video platforms

| HRIDAY (India) (27 May 2020)
A study in India of tobacco content in streaming content popular with urban adolescents and young adults (15-24) found that seven in ten of the video series featured smoking. Four of the seven series with smoking showcased actual tobacco brands, including Camel, Salem, Newport and Marlboro. None of the series with smoking (including from Netflix and Amazon) comply with India's rules requiring health warnings and other protective measures. Peer-reviewed abstract of original research at https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2020/03/09/tobaccocontrol-2019-055360.full. Read more...

Streaming consumption rises during Covid-19

Nielsen | Nielsen (22 Apr 2020)
We also saw streaming of non-linear content increase across all age groups in Nielsen’s 56 largest metered markets during March 2020. With most schools closed across the country, younger demographics experienced the largest growth, with more than 60% increases between the weeks of March 2 and March 23 across all markets. Among persons 2+ streaming increased 57% in Local People Meter (LPM) markets and 46% in Set-Meter markets. And persons 25-54 showed similar gains. Read more...

Why the same fake cigarettes are used in TV and movies

Snyder C | Insider (17 Apr 2020)
We traced Morley back to some of its earliest appearances in Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" and "The Twilight Zone," to "The X-Files," "Friends," and even a 2020 episode of "Curb Your Enthusiasm." We also spoke to a film professor at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television to see why the popular fake brand is so significant in the history of entertainment. [Editor's note: This report says that a study found that villains do most of the smoking on screen. The only peer-reviewed study we know of, on this question, found that good guy smokers outnumber bad guy smokers, but that bad guy smokers are somewhat more influential on teens — so, overall, good guys and bad guy smokers account for equal harm. See: Tanski SE, Stoolmiller M, Dal Cin S, Worth K. Movie character smoking and adolescent smoking: Who matters more, good guys or bad guys? Pediatrics. 2009;124(1): 135–143. July 2009. Read more...

Streaming services flouting India’s regulations banning tobacco imagery in all media

BMJ Newsroom | BMJ (9 Apr 2020)
Stronger enforcement needed, while WHO guidelines should be updated, say researchers. Read more...

Just as tobacco advertising causes teen smoking, exposure to alcohol ads causes teens to drink

Rachel Harrison | NYU (24 Feb 2020)
[The authors] found that, in every aspect studied, the influence of tobacco and alcohol advertising on teens were analogous. For instance, both tobacco and alcohol companies have used mascots in advertisements (e.g., Joe Camel, the Budweiser frogs), which research shows are easily recognized and trusted by children. In addition, both tobacco and alcohol companies use or have used movies, television, and sporting events as opportunities for advertising and product placement, with studies showing that exposure to smoking and drinking increases the risk for youth initiation. Read more...

Pakistan health ministry wants smokefree TV

| TheNews.com (18 Feb 2020)
Islamabad:The Directorate of Tobacco Control of the Ministry of National Health Services has directed the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) to instruct all television channels to immediately cleanse their dramas and programmes of smoking scenes that lure young people towards tobacco use, and to instead consider telecasting public service messages against smoking, which kills 166,000 people in Pakistan each year. [Note: Pakistan, a party to WHO's binding global tobacco control treaty, joins China, India and others opposing youth exposure to tobacco promotion in commercial entertainment media.] Read more...

Tax breaks for movies get bad reviews

Scott Cohen | CNBC (31 Jan 2020)
[R]esearcher Robert Marich said in an interview with CNBC's "American Greed." "It … depends on the stomach of the voters to essentially subsidize an industry and lower taxes for a certain select industry, which means essentially raising taxes for everyone else." Read more...

What Disney bans from its movies

Meghan Jones | Reader's Digest (30 Jan 2020)
That popular "three things are banned" rumor certainly doesn't hold up for some of Disney's major franchise properties. Read more...

How we can effectively protect teens from e-cigarette addiction

Greg Simon | Thrive Global (9 Jan 2020)
…the e-cigarette industry knows that 50 years of proving smoking causes cancer means little to an 18-year-old who doesn’t know what Vietnam was. Not to mention that smoking in movies — a topic I worked on with Vice President Gore in the ’90s — has actually gotten worse since then. Read more...

2019

Netflix is ad free, but it isn't brand free

Tiffany Hsu | The New York Times (16 Dec 2019)
Tide Pod shout-outs onscreen. Flirtatious exchanges with companies on Twitter. Netflix may not run ads, but it has become a coveted marketing platform. [See Smokefree Movies' blog on cigarette brand display in Netflix' TV-14 "Stranger Things" fantasy series, at https://smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/blog/its-time-get-tobacco-brands-screen and our detailed September 2019 ad at https://smokefreemovies.ucsf.edu/sfm-ads/ad-131. — Editor] Read more...

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