News | 2020

2020

One third of young adults may be at risk … especially if they smoke

Mallory Moench | San Francisco Chronicle (13 Jul 2020)
Smoking was the most common risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications among otherwise largely healthy young people, the study found. Read more...

...Why the tobacco still?

Suraj Nair | Research Matters (30 Jun 2020)
Currently, government intervention in regulating digital content is still minimal. “There is a lack of a governing or certifying body or even a law to regulate the content shown in online platforms,” laments Dr Arora. Read more...

Ghana gov't pushes for movie warnings

| GhanaWeb (16 Jun 2020)
“Because we have banned tobacco advertisement, promotion and sponsorship, the tobacco industry may hide behind the movie industry, brand or social media influencers to indirectly advertise or promote their products. So we expect that anti-tobacco messages are run in movies that depict scenery of tobacco use to also inform or educate the viewers on the harmful effects of tobacco use,” [FDA official Olivia Agyekumwaa Boateng] added. Read more...

Desi cinema as a bad influence

The editors | Livemint (8 Jun 2020)
Researchers from US-based Vital Strategies and Imperial College, London, analysed 300 films from 1994 to 2013, and found that 93% of them had at least one depiction of booze usage, 70% had at least one of tobacco, and 21% of branded fast food. The average movie featured tobacco products four times, alcohol seven times, and the third of those bad habits a little less than half a time. Read more...

Hindi film industry exposed children to alcohol, tobacco, fast-food, says study

Neetu Chandra Sharma | Livemint (8 Jun 2020)
Hindi film industry (Bollywood), in the last two decades, has exposed audience including children to tobacco, alcohol and consumption of fast-food in its films, watching which is associated with initiation of their consumption, a research published in scientific journal PLOS One has stated. The research comes at a time when covid-19 pandemic has led to a surge in media consumption as people sit home and spend more time on their screens for entertainment and games. Read more...

Match lights ire

Sue Dunlevy | The Sunday Mail (Australia) (31 May 2020)
…And there are calls from Quit Victoria to give movies and TV shows depicting smoking higher classifications and include clear, upfront warnings. Read more...

Smoking on India's streaming video platforms

| HRIDAY (India) (27 May 2020)
A study in India of tobacco content in streaming content popular with urban adolescents and young adults (15-24) found that seven in ten of the video series featured smoking. Four of the seven series with smoking showcased actual tobacco brands, including Camel, Salem, Newport and Marlboro. None of the series with smoking (including from Netflix and Amazon) comply with India's rules requiring health warnings and other protective measures. Peer-reviewed abstract of original research at https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2020/03/09/tobaccocontrol-2019-055360.full. Read more...

Streaming consumption rises during Covid-19

Nielsen | Nielsen (22 Apr 2020)
We also saw streaming of non-linear content increase across all age groups in Nielsen’s 56 largest metered markets during March 2020. With most schools closed across the country, younger demographics experienced the largest growth, with more than 60% increases between the weeks of March 2 and March 23 across all markets. Among persons 2+ streaming increased 57% in Local People Meter (LPM) markets and 46% in Set-Meter markets. And persons 25-54 showed similar gains. Read more...

Why the same fake cigarettes are used in TV and movies

Snyder C | Insider (17 Apr 2020)
We traced Morley back to some of its earliest appearances in Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho" and "The Twilight Zone," to "The X-Files," "Friends," and even a 2020 episode of "Curb Your Enthusiasm." We also spoke to a film professor at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television to see why the popular fake brand is so significant in the history of entertainment. [Editor's note: This report says that a study found that villains do most of the smoking on screen. The only peer-reviewed study we know of, on this question, found that good guy smokers outnumber bad guy smokers, but that bad guy smokers are somewhat more influential on teens — so, overall, good guys and bad guy smokers account for equal harm. See: Tanski SE, Stoolmiller M, Dal Cin S, Worth K. Movie character smoking and adolescent smoking: Who matters more, good guys or bad guys? Pediatrics. 2009;124(1): 135–143. July 2009. Read more...

Streaming services flouting India’s regulations banning tobacco imagery in all media

BMJ Newsroom | BMJ (9 Apr 2020)
Stronger enforcement needed, while WHO guidelines should be updated, say researchers. Read more...

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